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Dold, Schakowsky Help Avoid Fall From Fiscal Cliff

Dold chairs some of debate as term draws to a close.

North Shore members of Congress joined forces in unusual ways Tuesday to help the country avoid the fiscal cliff after weeks of drama, threats and fear as the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives voted New Year's Day to avert higher taxes for most Americans.

After the Senate made its move in the wee hours of the day with an 89-8 tally, the House voted late Tuesday, 257-167, to pass the measure with Rep. Jan Schakowsky (D-Evanston) and Rep. Robert Dold (R-Kenilworth) on the same side for one of the few times in the 112th Congress. 

Earlier: What falling off the fiscal cliff could cost you?

That heads off tax increases for about 99 percent of Americans, the Los Angeles Times reported. 

Dold joined only 89 other Republicans—and 167 Democrats—of the 241 in the lower chamber to help American families earning less than $450,000 and individuals making less than $400,000 pay fewer taxes in the new year.

“We are keeping rates low” for most U.S. workers,” Dold said in a Chicago Sun-Times story. “I do hope that there are going to be other opportunities to talk about reining in spending because we have to do that.”

Schakowsky was also pleased most Americans will not feel the pinch of higher taxes, according to the Sun-Times. “We stopped taxes going up for 98 percent of Americans,” she said in the Sun Times. “We asked the rich to pay more. For the first time in 20 years, Republicans are being force to vote for higher taxes. This is a good deal.”

Dold also spent much of the day chairing debate on the House floor while Speaker John Boehner (R-OH) was closeted in meetings. The bipartisan vote needing more Democrats than Republicans for passage may have been Dold’s last.

Rep. elect Brad Schneider (D-Deerfield) will take Dold’s place representing the 10th Congressional District when the 113th Congress is sworn in Thursday.

How does that affect us on the ground here in the Chicago suburbs? Will your family's paycheck(s) remain the same, as opposed to being shrunk? How does that affect your family?

The deal means there will not be spending cuts on programs, such as Medicare, that benefit middle-class and lower-income earners, the San Jose Mercury News reported. 

However, the payroll tax will increase for virtually all working Americans, who will now see Social Security deductions increased by about two percentage points, NPR reports.

Some Democrats championed that, while Republicans emphasized the need for cuts to pay for expenses the government has already committed to. Where do you stand on this?

Scroll down to the comments and tell us your reaction.

McCloud January 02, 2013 at 02:40 PM
Where do you stand on our country printing money for several generations to come to pay for? Good grief.
community organizer 1 January 02, 2013 at 04:40 PM
"Schakowsky was also pleased most Americans will not feel the pinch of higher taxes" Scumbag politician everyone knows all hard working people took a tax increase. Once again 75% of the people have to pay for the lazy give me give 25%. Maybe i should quit my job get 99 weeks of free money, get a free phone, have my food paid for, have my heating bill paid and of course have the state pay for my rent. Hmm
McCloud January 02, 2013 at 05:03 PM
How do people like Schakowsky, Dold, Durbin get the gonads to speak to people? They have made our country bankrupt, with no way out. Should interest rates rise from the far out fantasy that business wants to expand, our debt will crater the world's economy. Yet Durbin and company go unquestioned.
Lennie Jarratt January 02, 2013 at 06:22 PM
"That heads off tax increases for about 99 percent of Americans, the Los Angeles Times reported. " -- Actually anyone that works has a 2% increase in their taxes —Social Security payroll tax cut: Allows a 2-percentage-point cut in the payroll tax first enacted two years ago to lapse, which restores the payroll tax to 6.2 percent. http://news.yahoo.com/details-senate-bill-averting-fiscal-cliff-083204095--finance.html
RB January 02, 2013 at 08:36 PM
One of the best decisions Mr. Dold made during his short time in Congress was last night. Thanks!
Jon Hall January 02, 2013 at 10:54 PM
He'd never be competitive in this district if he'd gone the other way. Now he can run for lieutenant governor.
Just Sayin January 03, 2013 at 12:59 AM
McClown...I wonder about your gonads. Your comments are intellectually bankrupt on a regular basis...yet you keep blathering on with no apparent filter. Please...go find a "far out fantasy" to get lost in. Oh wait...I just described your life. LOL.
Don't Blame me i voted for the other guy 2012 January 03, 2013 at 01:21 AM
I truly hope and pray that Jan Schakowsky & "DICK" Durbin both fall off this fiscail cliff head first and die with a great amount of pain and suffering first.
Don't Blame me i voted for the other guy 2012 January 03, 2013 at 01:36 AM
And i truly hope and pray it is a slow painful interbody experence for them
Just Sayin January 03, 2013 at 03:37 AM
Hey...Don't Blame Me...I blame you!!! May you suffer the same consequences you wish on others X100.
Marty Thompsen January 03, 2013 at 04:26 AM
Because everything they vote on doesn't affect them ... only "we the people." They want their pensions but they will "steal" the pensions of the Illinois teachers saying they will pay back ... one big lie ... they want a raise ... they give themselves a raise ... employers have to cut back so we don't get a raise ... and so on and so on
SeanS65 January 03, 2013 at 11:06 AM
What a bunch of whiners. Man up. You have to pay to play. You are more than welcome to leave this country and go to another to get a perspective of taxes. We have ot s easy in the USA.

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